Sep 29, 2020 | Resources

Logo File Field Guide:
 How to Make Sense of Your Fresh, New Logo Files

Whether you’re DIY-ing your brand or calling in the pros *ahem*, you’ll need some logo files. If you just received fresh brand assets from Circa, consider this your official logo un-boxing tutorial.

Why do I need so many files? This seems overkill! I only have one logo file, and I use it for everything! These might be some of the thoughts you’re having, and we definitely hear you. In short: yes you need them; no, it’s not overkill; yikes, call us immediately. Because you use your logo in a variety of digital and physical applications—websites, social media, business cards, pencils, t-shirts—your logo needs vary. Without a flexible system of logo configurations, it’s hard for your brand to show up anywhere and everywhere you need it. Moreover, without the right file types on hand, your logo will surely look blurry in print, load slowly on the web, or fail to meet necessary specifications when you send it to a printer, media outlet, or publicity partner

At Circa, we save out logos in three main categories: working logo files, print logo files, and web logo files. Below is a rundown of logo files we always include, and some tips on how and where to use them.

Working File Icon

Working Logo Files

These are your master files for editing, resizing, and resaving new logo versions. These come in two forms: AI (Adobe Illustrator) and EPS (Encapsulated PostScript).

AI — Adobe Illustrator

Scalable and vector-based with editable text, these file types should be reserved for designers and used only when edits to your original artwork are needed (basically never).

When to Use

Editing original artwork (rebranding, expanding logo system)

Saving additional logo sizes

Sharing with designers

Considerations

You’ll need Adobe Illustrator to open these files.

You can access editable logo text in these files.

You can share these files with designers or whenever working files are requested. (Remember to include font files to ensure it opens properly.)

EPS

Scalable, vector-based file type without editable text used to save out additional sizes of your logo without pixelation or loss of quality

When to Use:

Saving additional logo sizes and specs

Sharing with printers

Print materials (business cards, brochures, etc.)

Oversized signage (billboards, vehicle wraps, posters, etc.)

Stickers and labels

Clothing and swag

Considerations:

You’ll need Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, or Photoshop to edit these files.

They’re not always readable on PCs.

You won’t be able to edit text.

You can enlarge these files to any size.

You can share these files with designers and printers (No need to include font files).

Printer Icon

Print Logos

CMYK / 300 dpi / Multiple Sizes

JPG

Versatile, pixel-based files with solid colored backgrounds, JPGs are a handy option for lots of uses, so we include a few large, high resolution versions in your library.

When to Use:

Business cards

Printed letterhead

Brochures

Postcards

 

Considerations:

JPEG files don’t need fancy software to open them.

They’re compressed, so they’re very lightweight.

Don’t scale larger. (It will look blurry and pixelated if you do.)

Don’t resize or resave from these files. (Image quality will degrade each time you do.)

PDF

Universal file types that retain vector information and editing capabilities (like an .Ai or .EPS), but can be opened without proprietary software.

When to Use:

Sharing with printers

Print materials (business cards, brochures, etc.)

Stickers and labels

Clothing and swag

Considerations:

They’re an easy-to-read file format that’s easy to share.

Formatting stays consistent on every device.

PDFs support transparent backgrounds.

You’ll need Adobe Illustrator to edit these files.

Web Browser Icon

Web Logos

RGB / 72 dpi / Multiple Sizes

JPG

Versatile, pixel-based files with solid colored backgrounds, JPGs are compressed, lightweight, and especially handy for web applications. You’ll find a range of common web sizes saved in your library.

When to Use:

Websites and blogs

Social media

Email marketing

Presentations

Considerations:

JPG files don’t need fancy software to open them.

They’re compressed, so they’re very lightweight.

Don’t scale larger. (It will look blurry and pixelated if you do.)

Don’t resize or resave from these files. (Image quality will degrade each time you do.)

PNG

Transparency-friendly and lossless compression, these files are perfect for almost any digital application, especially perfect for logos with no background color.

When to Use:

Websites and blogs
Social media
Email marketing
Presentations
Digital letterhead
Favicons (the tiny icon in your browser tab)
Photography (e.g. to add a watermark)

Considerations:

PNGs won’t lose quality when resaved.

They have transparent backgrounds. (No awkward white box!)

They’re an easy-to-read file format that’s easy to share.

Don’t scale larger. (It will look blurry and pixelated if you do.)

More to read…